Ulysses Gains Drag and Drop Support and More

Yesterday Ulysses, the best writing app on iOS, released an update adding some UI changes to bring it inline with the iOS 11 interface (big headers over lists), as well as support for one of the most important iOS 11 features: Drag and drop. With drag and drop support in Ulysses, you can now drag sheets to arrange or move them, drag text and other elements within a sheet, and even drag text out of a sheet to create a new sheet with that text. This works on both iPhone and iPad. On iPad only, you can also use drag and drop between applications. Now you can drag text, links, or images and drop them into a sheet! Hopefully the future will see dragging out of Ulysses updated to include export options as well.

In addition to drag and drop, this release also adds the ability to preview images inline with your words. This doesn’t work if you’re using image links, but if you add images directly to your sheet, you’ll get a subtle, low-distraction preview inline. You can also now edit with multiple panes open. Previously, when you would start editing a sheet, the library and sheet list panes would be closed. Now, on iPad, you can edit with these open. I think that’s a good change for the screen real estate available on the larger iPad Pro. Finally, they also made some changes to how the library is viewed.

Of course, drag and drop is the highlight of this release. Ulysses is a powerful tool for writers, whether you use it for notes, papers, personal writing, fiction, or blogging. I write all of my posts in Ulysses and am happy to support them through an annual subscription. It’s great to see them continue development and bring excellent new features to one of my favorite apps.

If you aren’t already using it, Ulysses is free to try, and has an in-app purchase for monthly or annual subscription plans, which give you access to the app on iPhone, iPad, and macOS. An educational discount is available for the subscription as well. Check it out!

Learn Ulysses: Here It Is (The Sweet Setup)

You deserve to be free to focus on your ideas, your writing, your notes, and your research. That’s why I use Ulysses, and that’s why I want to help you learn Ulysses and discover everything it’s capable of doing.

The Sweet Setup has launched a new course for learning Ulysses, the powerful dual-platform (iOS and macOS) text editor from developers The Soulmen. I haven’t had a chance to check out the course yet but it sounds good and has some good reviews from those who have. Learn Ulysses consists of 7 videos, which seem to cover everything there is to know about using Ulysses.

Ulysses has been the subject of some discussion lately, since their recent switch to a subscription pricing model. Some folks might not be able to justify the cost given how they use Ulysses, while others will know that they use it too much not to purchase a subscription. Personally, I took advantage of the annual subscription’s discount for existing users. I don’t hold any issue with their decision to switch, as long as it enables them to continue to provide the excellent quality Ulysses customers have come to know and expect in their favorite writing app.

If you recently decided to purchase a subscription for Ulysses, or you’re considering whether it will be worth it for you, personally, Learn Ulysses might be able to help you make that decision or figure out if it was the right decision for you to have made, by showing you everything you can do with it and maybe even giving you some ideas on ways you can take your use further. Like I said, I haven’t seen it, and this isn’t a review. However I like and trust the work of Shawn Blanc and the others at The Sweet Setup.

If you’re interested in this course, it’s usually $29 but you can get a launch week special of 20% and grab it for $23 now.

The Sweet Setup on Saving Instapaper Highlights to Ulysses

I’ve been using Ulysses on iOS on and off over the past year, but I recently switched to it full time for my writing needs. It’s a powerful app with a lot to offer, like excellent support for automation and publishing, including publishing directly to WordPress, which I’ve found very useful over the last couple of months. Not to mention, it’s a beautiful app that makes your text look great. Instapaper is another beautiful app, which I’ve been using for several years, which makes other people’s text look great, by presenting articles in a beautified, simplified format, allowing you to read, save, share, listen to, speed-read, highlight, and annotate articles.

The Sweet Setup, last week, wrote about using IFTTT and Dropbox to automatically save Instapaper highlights to Ulysses for research. I’m currently doing research for a job I want to apply for, and really hope to get, so I decided to give this a try. I setup my IFTTT applet similar to how it is described in the link above. However, I changed it to use the Append to Text File Dropbox action, rather than the Create New Text File action. I also made another important change at the beginning. Rather than using New Instapaper Highlight as the trigger in my applet, I changed it to use the New Comment option instead. I’ve saved to Instapaper some articles related to this job position, a newer form of technology it involves, information about the future of the industry, etc. Instead of just highlighting important bits, I wanted to add a note for each bit I found important, stating why I thought it important, or some quick thoughts on how it is relevant. In Instapaper, adding a comment to selected text automatically highlights it as well and, if you’re using the comment option for the trigger in IFTTT, then both your note and the highlighted text are available. I setup my applet to format the highlighted bit as a markdown quote, with my note below it.

Configuration of an applet to save Instapaper comments to Ulysses (via Dropbox)

It’s been useful so far. If nothing else, just having my highlights and related notes in Ulysses is a good start. I do wish IFTTT would allow me to only include the URL and Title of the article in the first comment for a particular article, rather than each highlight however, I can work with that for now. I also setup and applet specifically for highlights (without comments), but I haven’t yet tested with both turned on, to see if they play nicely together on the same article (i.e. if I make some comments in an article, as well as some simple highlights without comments, if both will be appended to the same file, without duplicating the highlights when a comment is used, since comments also highlight the selected text. If anybody has ideas about that or has tried it, I’d be interested to hear. For my current mission, at least, the comment version will work sufficiently. Thanks to The Sweet Setup for another good idea and, if you haven’t before, you should check out the site.