MacStories: A Photo Tour of Apple’s New Flagship Chicago Store

Over at MacStories, John Voorhees published a nice photo tour of the new Apple Store that just opened in Chicago. The photos probably don’t do it justice:

It’s hard to appreciate just how completely the store disappears into its surroundings unless you see it for yourself. The illusion is enhanced by even the smallest touches like the grooves in the staircases that continue from the interior of the store to its exterior.

It looks incredible and I hope to get to see it in the near future, and the photos are pretty great.

Ulysses Gains Drag and Drop Support and More

Yesterday Ulysses, the best writing app on iOS, released an update adding some UI changes to bring it inline with the iOS 11 interface (big headers over lists), as well as support for one of the most important iOS 11 features: Drag and drop. With drag and drop support in Ulysses, you can now drag sheets to arrange or move them, drag text and other elements within a sheet, and even drag text out of a sheet to create a new sheet with that text. This works on both iPhone and iPad. On iPad only, you can also use drag and drop between applications. Now you can drag text, links, or images and drop them into a sheet! Hopefully the future will see dragging out of Ulysses updated to include export options as well.

In addition to drag and drop, this release also adds the ability to preview images inline with your words. This doesn’t work if you’re using image links, but if you add images directly to your sheet, you’ll get a subtle, low-distraction preview inline. You can also now edit with multiple panes open. Previously, when you would start editing a sheet, the library and sheet list panes would be closed. Now, on iPad, you can edit with these open. I think that’s a good change for the screen real estate available on the larger iPad Pro. Finally, they also made some changes to how the library is viewed.

Of course, drag and drop is the highlight of this release. Ulysses is a powerful tool for writers, whether you use it for notes, papers, personal writing, fiction, or blogging. I write all of my posts in Ulysses and am happy to support them through an annual subscription. It’s great to see them continue development and bring excellent new features to one of my favorite apps.

If you aren’t already using it, Ulysses is free to try, and has an in-app purchase for monthly or annual subscription plans, which give you access to the app on iPhone, iPad, and macOS. An educational discount is available for the subscription as well. Check it out!

Bear Adds New Drop Bar for Taking Action on Multiple Notes Quickly

Bear’s latest update takes advantage of a core iOS 11 feature in an interesting new way

Bear’s new Drop Bar lets you take quick action on multiple notes

In the latest release today – version 1.3 – notes app Bear added Apple Watch support, as well an interesting new feature called the Drop Bar. The Drop Bar takes advantage of the new drag and drop support in iOS 11 and works on both iPad and iPhone. Start dragging a note, and the Drop Bar will appear along the bottom of the screen. You can add other notes to your drag selection and, when you’re ready, drop them onto the Drop Bar to reveal a list of actions.

The action selected will be applied across all of the notes dropped onto it. The available actions include pinning the notes, moving them to trash, duplicating, sharing, copying the note links, copying the note identifiers, completing all tasks within selected notes, removing specific tags, and exporting or copying as one combined note, in various formats. The Export action provides several formats, including txt, markdown, Textbundle, PDF, Taskpaper, DOCX, and a couple of others.

While I still have been using Ulysses more frequently for notes and writing, I do have some notes in Bear, particularly some personal documentation (because of Bear’s support for easy inter-note linking). I’m a fan of Bear, and would like to get more use out of it. With this latest update, they continue to take advantage of iOS features in a smart way that fits with their overall design, of which I am a fan. I may give them a try for more general notes again and see how useful the Drop Bar can be for me.

If you’ve not already checked it out, Bear is available for free on the App Store, with a $1.49/month subscription available as an in-app purchase to unlock Bear Pro.

Farewell, TextTool

Sad news in the iOS Utilities category: Craig Pearlman has announced he will be ending development of his excellent iOS text utility, TextTool 2.

I’ve been a fan of TextTool since version one launched, and was excited to upgrade to version 2 fairly recently. Unfortunately, it didn’t bring in enough money to support development. This is a real shame. I’ve conversed with Craig a few times on Twitter and Slack and I can only imagine how much care he put into revamping TextTool for version 2 (though one doesn’t have to imagine if they’ve ever used the app; it shows).

TextTool was built out of love for iOS and the need to perform certain types of tasks. It started as a simple idea and grew. TextTool 2 was written to take this to the next level, to try to provide a desktop-class experience to a platform that needed it.

As he says in his post, he will be back; I don’t doubt that and I look forward to seeing what comes next from Blackfog Interactive. I’m the meantime, I hope somebody who can keep it true acquires TextTool 2.

Crashplan drops consumer level plans

If you’re a Crashplan user, you probably have already heard that they’re dropping their consumer level plans in order to better meet the needs of their enterprise and small business customers. As a business decision, I can understand that. While they are allowing current customers’ plans to continue, they wont be starting new plans or renewing those existing plans once they expire. They are providing a 60-day extension to current customers to find a replacement and move their data over, which seems fair in my opinion.

For Crashplan users, this would be a great time to give Backblaze a try. If you don’t have an off-site backup strategy yet, then you’re tempting fate and should check out Backblaze all the same. At just $5/month per computer, you can have all of your data backed up off-site. Download select items from their web interface or iOS app as needed and should some unfortunate circumstances befall you and you don’t want to redownload all of your data, they can ship you a hard drive with all of your data on it ready to go.

I’ve been a happy Backblaze user for a few years now. For just $5/month, my MacBook Air and my external hard drive are both backed up, keeping all of my data, as well as my Dropbox data, and my Lightroom catalog and photos, backed up in an additional off-site location. Best of all, it’s completely automated and I hardly have to do a thing once it’s been setup.

If you decide to try Backblaze, you can try it out here and get a free month of service (full disclosure: that is an affiliate link and I will also get a free month).