iOS 11 beta after one week

Some quick thoughts on the iOS 11 beta, one week in.

Since iOS 8’s extensions, it’s been hard to imagine using iOS pre-8.0. The same thing happened with multitasking on the iPad in iOS 9. At this point, I couldn’t imagine using an iPad with iOS 10 again. I’ve only been using the beta for about a week and it’s been a joy so far… on the iPad.

In contrast, I had to reset all settings on my iPhone, and it’s still a bit slow. Also, I lost a few years worth of health data, so that’s been fun. The crashes I’ve experienced on the iPad have been relatively minor and are likely to be resolved in the next iteration. It’s worth it, to me, to have much smoother and faster operations and a significantly improved dock and multi-tasking system.

The app switcher, app spaces, the new dock, and being able to have a second app hover over and just swipe it off screen and out of the way are just some of the joys I’ve found so far in the new iOS 11 for iPad. And it really does feel like that: for iPad. I hope this is a sign of the future, marking a more prominent divergence in iOS between the two platforms. The iPad can be a lot better and that’s the direction iOS 11 seems to be taking us. I’m excited to see other apps begin to adopt these new features as we approach September, especially drag-and-drop. It might take some getting used to but I think anybody who does any work at all from an iPad will appreciate iOS 11.

Link: ‘Your’ vs. ‘My’ (Daring Fireball)

I have to agree with John Gruber’s assessment of Tom Warren’s review on The Verge regarding the new iPad Pro and iOS 11 beta:

Tom Warren’s review for The Verge of the new iPad Pro and iOS 11 beta is headlined “iOS 11 on an iPad Pro Still Won’t Replace Your Laptop”. Exactly in line with my piece yesterday, that “your” should be a “my”.

As well as this:

Again, Apple is not trying to convince everyone to replace a traditional Mac or PC with an iPad. Apple executives say that the Mac has a bright and long future because they really do think the Mac has a bright and long future. Any review of the iPad and iOS 11 from the perspective of whether it can replace a MacBook for everyone is going to completely miss what is better about the iPad and why.

I think he is right on point with that. Apple isn’t trying to replace the Mac entirely. They still have plans and the Mac still has a future. They made quite a show of it at the WWDC keynote this year with new hardware and new technologies for AR and VR.

Sure, the iPad isn’t a Mac. And neither is the Mac an iPad. Where I see the strengths of using one device for a particular purpose, you might see weakness of using that same device for your own needs, and vice versa. I don’t think there is any valid debate as to whether or not the iPad Pro (and perhaps even an iPad Air) can replace a laptop. It’s not a fringe case. You can argue whether or not it can replace a laptop for everyone but you’d be missing the point entirely.

When I handled customer support for Workflow, I saw plenty of people doing plenty of work with iPads alone – and I do mean real work. MacStories is a perfect example of work being done iPad-first (or mostly iPad only). Hell, most of my work in the last two years was done from an iPad, and an Air 2 rather than a Pro at that. iOS 11’s new iPad productivity features certainly aren’t a setback to this. I don’t think there is any reason to suggest Apple is trying to force or convince everyone to go iPad only and toss out their Macs, and I don’t see them sheltering the Mac anytime soon. What i see with iOS 11 is Apple trying to make the iPad a better, more productive work environment for those who want to use it as such.

I have a 2014 MacBook Air and while I’d love to replace it with a newer MacBook Pro, I do love my Mac and I don’t plan on giving it up. I have a lot of great software there and I enjoy the look and feel of the system, the hardware, all of it. I feel the same for iOS and the iPad (and the iPhone), especially in iOS 11. Going forward, (and getting my first iPad Pro tomorrow) I have a feeling I will be doing most things from my iPad. I have my reasons, some of them being portability, speed, and the enjoyment I get from using a multi-touch-sensitive piece of glass capable of running great software, side by side, without a clutter of windows, and with fewer distractions.

There are other reasons but ultimately I enjoy using it and for what I need to do, the iPad is sufficient. There are plenty of people for whom the iPad Pro is sufficient enough for the work they need to do, but who feel more comfortable with a traditional keyboard/mouse interface. I get the feeling they’ll be able to continue doing so for a long time, but the iPad is a better way to work than a laptop for me.

Source: Daring Fireball

Optimistic iOS User

Some thoughts on why I am optimistic about the future of productivity, automation, and professional use of iOS — specifically the iPad.

Earlier this week, in the keynote for their annual Worldwide Developers Conference, Apple announced the next version of iOS: iOS 11. The announcement of the next version of iOS was expected, of course, but there some changes I wasn’t expecting quite yet but was happy to see, particularly in regards to the iPad which, as they joked on stage, is being turning up to 11.

We all have our own critiques, and I’m no different, but I’m generally an optimist about these things. iOS certainly has its flaws, as an software platform will, but the announcements from Monday do a lot to move the iPad forward as a legitimate computer; something some of us already saw it as, despite room for improvement. I expected Apple to eventually implement better features for multitasking (and perhaps even drag and drop), although I was expecting to have to wait another year or so — what a pleasant surprise. I haven’t gotten my hands on the beta yet, but I plan to try the public beta later this month (after a proper backbup, of course!). That said, I remain optimistic about the productivity improvements coming to the iPad.

The revamped control center and app switcher — resembling something more like Mission Control on macOS, the improved dock, the implementation of drag and drop, screen recording, and instant markup for screenshots — just to name a few — will undoubtedly enable many iPad power users to get more done more efficiently than before and, hopefully, draw in new iPad users and an increase in use for existing-but-less-frequent iPad users, pushing further it’s place in the wide world of computing devices.

I know a lot of people were concerned with Apple’s acquisition of Workflow. Some who rely on the app for work and other reasons were worried that this might be the end of Workflow and perhaps lead to less powerful automation on iOS. One of the reasons I can remain hopeful about the future of iOS — and specifically the iPad — in terms of automation, productivity, and professional work is that after being a part of the Workflow team for a little more than two years, I can say that they loved working on Workflow as much, or more, than I did: developing it, improving it, introducing new features to our customers. They were passionate about it. While I don’t have any inside information, I personally don’t think they would have made such a deal if they didn’t think they could continue to do these things in some manner at Apple. I should reiterate that I’m not basing this on anything other than what I saw working with them for a couple of years so I could certainly be wrong but, as I said before, I am optimistic.