Workflow Updated for iOS 11 and the iPhone X

Anybody who knows me knows that I love Workflow for iOS. I followed its development prior to its initial launch and, about a week after it launched, I began helping them with customer support. A few months later I would be hired on full time and have the privilege of working with the wonderful Workflow team for two years. Since being acquired by Apple in March 2017, Workflow updates seem less frequent. I’m still optimistic that this is for a good reason, yet to be revealed. Fortunately, the recent 1.7.7 update may help those whose faith had become shaky in recent months.

With 1.7.7, Workflow is updated to support the iPhone X, as well as drag and drop on iOS 11. I mentioned on Twitter a few weeks ago that I would love an app similar to the shelf app concept, except rather than just storing data and providing it in multiple available data types, it would intelligently run actions on the data you drop into it, based on which action you drop it on. Well, there are plenty of shelf apps — including my favorite so far, Gladys — but with the latest update, Workflow meets the needs I was discussing before. Now you can drag content and drop it into a workflow in the Workflow app, and it will run that workflow using the dropped content as input.

This is something I’ve been hoping to see since iOS 11 launched and it makes sense that Workflow would be the app for this. Now you can drop an image into a workflow and have it uploaded to Dropbox, or drag a link from Safari into a workflow to share it with predefined recipients and text.

To drag and drop content as input, simply drop the item on the Run Workflow button (the one that looks like a play button) — that entire rectangular section is a drop zone and will become highlighted to indicate this when content is dragged over it. From the main workflow view, you can hover over a workflow with dragged content for a second and the workflow will open, allowing you to drop the item(s) inside the workflow to run it.

I made a quick test workflow after updating, which accepts a URL for an article and generates markdown formatted text in the format:

# Title
By: Author on Publish Date
> Excerpt
**From:** URL

I can drag a link from the address bar in Safari, and drop it on the Run button at the top of the workflow. This will take that URL as input and run it through the Get Article from Webpage action, and then extract all the desired details into a single Text action using Workflow’s powerful and efficient magic variables system.

I hope to see continued development and, as I’ve mentioned multiple times here and elsewhere, I remain optimistic about the future of Workflow. I’d like to see better drag and drop support for reordering workflows in the main view (something that is and always has been very buggy for me) as well as in the Settings for Watch and Today Widget workflows. The custom drag and drop implementation used for building workflows and moving actions has always been good to me, and I don’t know if it could be improved by adopting the new standard from Apple (or perhaps they have in this version?). There’s always room for improvement and I am confident we will see more from them over the next year but, for now at least, I’m happy to see the development continue.

In addition to drag and drop and iPhone X support, 1.7.7 also brings support for the new image formats of iOS 11, some new health data types, new iOS 11 files support such as multiple files with the Get Files action, and some other improvements — much welcome in its first iOS 11 update. You can view the entire list of features and fixes here.

If you’re not using Workflow already, check it out. The app is free since it was acquired so you have nothing to lose but time (which you just might gain back with Workflow). Be sure to check out the official documentation, r/workflow on Reddit, and the in-app gallery for help, examples, and inspiration.

The MacStories iOS 11 Review Audiobook

I’ve been reading MacStories since 2013. In that time, Federico has grown the site and its reach substantially, bringing on more writers, publishing more content, redesigning the site a couple of years ago, and all the while delivering excellent content consistently. Needless to say, I’m a fan.

I’m also a big fan of the annual MacStories iOS review, published with the public release of iOS each September. This year, the gang at MacStories did something different: an audiobook version of the iOS 11 review. This review is long and detailed though, from what I read of it, a good read (as to be expected). However, some folks don’t have a lot of time to read through it all, while listening to the review on one’s commute can be easier and quicker. Even better, the review is read by Myke Hurley (of the RelayFM podcast network). If you’re a fan of RelayFM’s excellent shows like Upgrade and Connected, then you’ll likely enjoy listening to this. The review comes in at around 5 hours, and I’m about halfway through it, but it’s a great listen and loaded with interesting information and explanations. For example, I didn’t know I could tap a Safari link with two fingers to open it in a new tab.

The audiobook can be purchased here for $9.99 but if you’re a Club MacStories member, you can get it for $3.99. (Hint: you can join Club MacStories for just $5 monthly) and get lots of great extras, in addition the monthly newsletter!

Ulysses Gains Drag and Drop Support and More

Yesterday Ulysses, the best writing app on iOS, released an update adding some UI changes to bring it inline with the iOS 11 interface (big headers over lists), as well as support for one of the most important iOS 11 features: Drag and drop. With drag and drop support in Ulysses, you can now drag sheets to arrange or move them, drag text and other elements within a sheet, and even drag text out of a sheet to create a new sheet with that text. This works on both iPhone and iPad. On iPad only, you can also use drag and drop between applications. Now you can drag text, links, or images and drop them into a sheet! Hopefully the future will see dragging out of Ulysses updated to include export options as well.

In addition to drag and drop, this release also adds the ability to preview images inline with your words. This doesn’t work if you’re using image links, but if you add images directly to your sheet, you’ll get a subtle, low-distraction preview inline. You can also now edit with multiple panes open. Previously, when you would start editing a sheet, the library and sheet list panes would be closed. Now, on iPad, you can edit with these open. I think that’s a good change for the screen real estate available on the larger iPad Pro. Finally, they also made some changes to how the library is viewed.

Of course, drag and drop is the highlight of this release. Ulysses is a powerful tool for writers, whether you use it for notes, papers, personal writing, fiction, or blogging. I write all of my posts in Ulysses and am happy to support them through an annual subscription. It’s great to see them continue development and bring excellent new features to one of my favorite apps.

If you aren’t already using it, Ulysses is free to try, and has an in-app purchase for monthly or annual subscription plans, which give you access to the app on iPhone, iPad, and macOS. An educational discount is available for the subscription as well. Check it out!

Bear Adds New Drop Bar for Taking Action on Multiple Notes Quickly

Bear’s latest update takes advantage of a core iOS 11 feature in an interesting new way

Bear’s new Drop Bar lets you take quick action on multiple notes

In the latest release today – version 1.3 – notes app Bear added Apple Watch support, as well an interesting new feature called the Drop Bar. The Drop Bar takes advantage of the new drag and drop support in iOS 11 and works on both iPad and iPhone. Start dragging a note, and the Drop Bar will appear along the bottom of the screen. You can add other notes to your drag selection and, when you’re ready, drop them onto the Drop Bar to reveal a list of actions.

The action selected will be applied across all of the notes dropped onto it. The available actions include pinning the notes, moving them to trash, duplicating, sharing, copying the note links, copying the note identifiers, completing all tasks within selected notes, removing specific tags, and exporting or copying as one combined note, in various formats. The Export action provides several formats, including txt, markdown, Textbundle, PDF, Taskpaper, DOCX, and a couple of others.

While I still have been using Ulysses more frequently for notes and writing, I do have some notes in Bear, particularly some personal documentation (because of Bear’s support for easy inter-note linking). I’m a fan of Bear, and would like to get more use out of it. With this latest update, they continue to take advantage of iOS features in a smart way that fits with their overall design, of which I am a fan. I may give them a try for more general notes again and see how useful the Drop Bar can be for me.

If you’ve not already checked it out, Bear is available for free on the App Store, with a $1.49/month subscription available as an in-app purchase to unlock Bear Pro.

iOS 11 beta after one week

Some quick thoughts on the iOS 11 beta, one week in.

Since iOS 8’s extensions, it’s been hard to imagine using iOS pre-8.0. The same thing happened with multitasking on the iPad in iOS 9. At this point, I couldn’t imagine using an iPad with iOS 10 again. I’ve only been using the beta for about a week and it’s been a joy so far… on the iPad.

In contrast, I had to reset all settings on my iPhone, and it’s still a bit slow. Also, I lost a few years worth of health data, so that’s been fun. The crashes I’ve experienced on the iPad have been relatively minor and are likely to be resolved in the next iteration. It’s worth it, to me, to have much smoother and faster operations and a significantly improved dock and multi-tasking system.

The app switcher, app spaces, the new dock, and being able to have a second app hover over and just swipe it off screen and out of the way are just some of the joys I’ve found so far in the new iOS 11 for iPad. And it really does feel like that: for iPad. I hope this is a sign of the future, marking a more prominent divergence in iOS between the two platforms. The iPad can be a lot better and that’s the direction iOS 11 seems to be taking us. I’m excited to see other apps begin to adopt these new features as we approach September, especially drag-and-drop. It might take some getting used to but I think anybody who does any work at all from an iPad will appreciate iOS 11.