Farewell, TextTool

Sad news in the iOS Utilities category: Craig Pearlman has announced he will be ending development of his excellent iOS text utility, TextTool 2.

I’ve been a fan of TextTool since version one launched, and was excited to upgrade to version 2 fairly recently. Unfortunately, it didn’t bring in enough money to support development. This is a real shame. I’ve conversed with Craig a few times on Twitter and Slack and I can only imagine how much care he put into revamping TextTool for version 2 (though one doesn’t have to imagine if they’ve ever used the app; it shows).

TextTool was built out of love for iOS and the need to perform certain types of tasks. It started as a simple idea and grew. TextTool 2 was written to take this to the next level, to try to provide a desktop-class experience to a platform that needed it.

As he says in his post, he will be back; I don’t doubt that and I look forward to seeing what comes next from Blackfog Interactive. I’m the meantime, I hope somebody who can keep it true acquires TextTool 2.

Link: ‘Your’ vs. ‘My’ (Daring Fireball)

I have to agree with John Gruber’s assessment of Tom Warren’s review on The Verge regarding the new iPad Pro and iOS 11 beta:

Tom Warren’s review for The Verge of the new iPad Pro and iOS 11 beta is headlined “iOS 11 on an iPad Pro Still Won’t Replace Your Laptop”. Exactly in line with my piece yesterday, that “your” should be a “my”.

As well as this:

Again, Apple is not trying to convince everyone to replace a traditional Mac or PC with an iPad. Apple executives say that the Mac has a bright and long future because they really do think the Mac has a bright and long future. Any review of the iPad and iOS 11 from the perspective of whether it can replace a MacBook for everyone is going to completely miss what is better about the iPad and why.

I think he is right on point with that. Apple isn’t trying to replace the Mac entirely. They still have plans and the Mac still has a future. They made quite a show of it at the WWDC keynote this year with new hardware and new technologies for AR and VR.

Sure, the iPad isn’t a Mac. And neither is the Mac an iPad. Where I see the strengths of using one device for a particular purpose, you might see weakness of using that same device for your own needs, and vice versa. I don’t think there is any valid debate as to whether or not the iPad Pro (and perhaps even an iPad Air) can replace a laptop. It’s not a fringe case. You can argue whether or not it can replace a laptop for everyone but you’d be missing the point entirely.

When I handled customer support for Workflow, I saw plenty of people doing plenty of work with iPads alone – and I do mean real work. MacStories is a perfect example of work being done iPad-first (or mostly iPad only). Hell, most of my work in the last two years was done from an iPad, and an Air 2 rather than a Pro at that. iOS 11’s new iPad productivity features certainly aren’t a setback to this. I don’t think there is any reason to suggest Apple is trying to force or convince everyone to go iPad only and toss out their Macs, and I don’t see them sheltering the Mac anytime soon. What i see with iOS 11 is Apple trying to make the iPad a better, more productive work environment for those who want to use it as such.

I have a 2014 MacBook Air and while I’d love to replace it with a newer MacBook Pro, I do love my Mac and I don’t plan on giving it up. I have a lot of great software there and I enjoy the look and feel of the system, the hardware, all of it. I feel the same for iOS and the iPad (and the iPhone), especially in iOS 11. Going forward, (and getting my first iPad Pro tomorrow) I have a feeling I will be doing most things from my iPad. I have my reasons, some of them being portability, speed, and the enjoyment I get from using a multi-touch-sensitive piece of glass capable of running great software, side by side, without a clutter of windows, and with fewer distractions.

There are other reasons but ultimately I enjoy using it and for what I need to do, the iPad is sufficient. There are plenty of people for whom the iPad Pro is sufficient enough for the work they need to do, but who feel more comfortable with a traditional keyboard/mouse interface. I get the feeling they’ll be able to continue doing so for a long time, but the iPad is a better way to work than a laptop for me.

Source: Daring Fireball

Kickstarter: Panobook from Studio Neat

Studio Neat, maker of products like the Neat Ice Kit, the Glif tripod mount for iPhone, cocktail app Highball, and more, is at it again, this time with a unique notebook called Panobook.

The idea is a panoramic notebook, long and short, that can more easily fit in places like the space in front of your keyboard. The notebook’s dimensions are 160mm x 288mm and the paper is dot grid. It looks like they’ve thoughtfully considered many details such as layout guide markers and a slip case to archive the notebook once you’ve filled it.

I’m really interested to give this notebook a try. Ben Brooks wrote up a review about the Panobook with some thoughts about his review copy. I’d definitely suggest backing it on Kickstarter if you’re a notebook person.

Link: How to make $80,000 per month on the Apple App Store

Johnny Lin tells of a scam in the form of a #10 Top Grossing productivity app on the Apple App Store with horrific grammar and spelling. Their app claims it can scan your entire device for viruses and malware — something that sandboxing on iOS does not allow — for an easy-to-miss $99.99 in-app purchase (and that’s just for a 7-day subscription). Lin explains better:

Touch ID? Okay! Wait… let’s read the fine print:

“Full Virus, Malware scanner”: What? I’m pretty sure it’s impossible for any app to scan my iPhone for viruses or malware, since third party apps are sandboxed to their own data, but let’s keep reading…

“You will pay $99.99 for a 7-day subscription”

Uhh… come again?

It’s crazy that an app can get through the review like this, and crazier to me that enough people could fall for it, but alas it/they did. Working in customer support for an iOS app, it became clear that a lot of iOS users aren’t aware of sandboxing, or don’t understand how it works. Being educated on this fact would likely curb the number of victims in such a scam. Obviously there are bigger issues here, but it might help to educate less tech literate friends or family.

Source: https://medium.com/@johnnylin/how-to-make-80-000-per-month-on-the-apple-app-store-bdb943862e88