The MacStories iOS 11 Review Audiobook

I’ve been reading MacStories since 2013. In that time, Federico has grown the site and its reach substantially, bringing on more writers, publishing more content, redesigning the site a couple of years ago, and all the while delivering excellent content consistently. Needless to say, I’m a fan.

I’m also a big fan of the annual MacStories iOS review, published with the public release of iOS each September. This year, the gang at MacStories did something different: an audiobook version of the iOS 11 review. This review is long and detailed though, from what I read of it, a good read (as to be expected). However, some folks don’t have a lot of time to read through it all, while listening to the review on one’s commute can be easier and quicker. Even better, the review is read by Myke Hurley (of the RelayFM podcast network). If you’re a fan of RelayFM’s excellent shows like Upgrade and Connected, then you’ll likely enjoy listening to this. The review comes in at around 5 hours, and I’m about halfway through it, but it’s a great listen and loaded with interesting information and explanations. For example, I didn’t know I could tap a Safari link with two fingers to open it in a new tab.

The audiobook can be purchased here for $9.99 but if you’re a Club MacStories member, you can get it for $3.99. (Hint: you can join Club MacStories for just $5 monthly) and get lots of great extras, in addition the monthly newsletter!

MacStories: A Photo Tour of Apple’s New Flagship Chicago Store

Over at MacStories, John Voorhees published a nice photo tour of the new Apple Store that just opened in Chicago. The photos probably don’t do it justice:

It’s hard to appreciate just how completely the store disappears into its surroundings unless you see it for yourself. The illusion is enhanced by even the smallest touches like the grooves in the staircases that continue from the interior of the store to its exterior.

It looks incredible and I hope to get to see it in the near future, and the photos are pretty great.

Ulysses Gains Drag and Drop Support and More

Yesterday Ulysses, the best writing app on iOS, released an update adding some UI changes to bring it inline with the iOS 11 interface (big headers over lists), as well as support for one of the most important iOS 11 features: Drag and drop. With drag and drop support in Ulysses, you can now drag sheets to arrange or move them, drag text and other elements within a sheet, and even drag text out of a sheet to create a new sheet with that text. This works on both iPhone and iPad. On iPad only, you can also use drag and drop between applications. Now you can drag text, links, or images and drop them into a sheet! Hopefully the future will see dragging out of Ulysses updated to include export options as well.

In addition to drag and drop, this release also adds the ability to preview images inline with your words. This doesn’t work if you’re using image links, but if you add images directly to your sheet, you’ll get a subtle, low-distraction preview inline. You can also now edit with multiple panes open. Previously, when you would start editing a sheet, the library and sheet list panes would be closed. Now, on iPad, you can edit with these open. I think that’s a good change for the screen real estate available on the larger iPad Pro. Finally, they also made some changes to how the library is viewed.

Of course, drag and drop is the highlight of this release. Ulysses is a powerful tool for writers, whether you use it for notes, papers, personal writing, fiction, or blogging. I write all of my posts in Ulysses and am happy to support them through an annual subscription. It’s great to see them continue development and bring excellent new features to one of my favorite apps.

If you aren’t already using it, Ulysses is free to try, and has an in-app purchase for monthly or annual subscription plans, which give you access to the app on iPhone, iPad, and macOS. An educational discount is available for the subscription as well. Check it out!

On Personalizing “Hey Siri”

From Apple’s Machine Learning Journal, in a piece about what goes on behind the scenes on your devices when you say “Hey Siri”:

We designed the always-on “Hey Siri” detector to respond whenever anyone in the vicinity says the trigger phrase. To reduce the annoyance of false triggers, we invite the user to go through a short enrollment session. During enrollment, the user says five phrases that each begin with “Hey Siri.” We save these examples on the device.

We compare any possible new “Hey Siri” utterance with the stored examples as follows. The (second-pass) detector produces timing information that is used to convert the acoustic pattern into a fixed-length vector, by taking the average over the frames aligned to each state. A separate, specially trained DNN transforms this vector into a “speaker space” where, by design, patterns from the same speaker tend to be close, whereas patterns from different speakers tend to be further apart. We compare the distances to the reference patterns created during enrollment with another threshold to decide whether the sound that triggered the detector is likely to be “Hey Siri” spoken by the enrolled user.

This process not only reduces the probability that “Hey Siri” spoken by another person will trigger the iPhone, but also reduces the rate at which other, similar-sounding phrases trigger Siri.

I found this whole thing very interesting, even as I am not experienced in the ways of machine learning. I found it particularly interesting because of something that happened last week: My wife and I were sitting on the couch and I used “Hey Siri” for something. Out of curiosity, I checked to see if it triggered hers, and indeed it did not. With my iPhone, iPad, and Apple Watch at the ready, I had her try to trigger my devices multiple times, with no success.

It’s neat to see what goes into helping Siri reduce the chances of these false activations. Granted, my wife is a female with a slight Mexican accent (only very slightly). The chance of false activation would be higher with another male speaker, I imagine, but the fact that it is able to store and use the enrollment examples to cut down on this is still really cool.

I wasn’t ignoring you

Unfortunately, I’ve had an issue here for a while now with email on my domain. I didn’t realize it initially, and afterwards it took a bit of time to track down and resolve the exact issue. As such, I have not been receiving emails sent to my domain email address @charlesbucher.net. If you have tried to contact me there, or tried to reach out via the Comments form here, I haven’t received it because of this error.

If you have tried, I apologize for the inconvenience. Feel free to try again, as the issue is now resolved and there should be no problems… Fingers crossed 🤞

Bear Adds New Drop Bar for Taking Action on Multiple Notes Quickly

Bear’s latest update takes advantage of a core iOS 11 feature in an interesting new way

Bear’s new Drop Bar lets you take quick action on multiple notes

In the latest release today – version 1.3 – notes app Bear added Apple Watch support, as well an interesting new feature called the Drop Bar. The Drop Bar takes advantage of the new drag and drop support in iOS 11 and works on both iPad and iPhone. Start dragging a note, and the Drop Bar will appear along the bottom of the screen. You can add other notes to your drag selection and, when you’re ready, drop them onto the Drop Bar to reveal a list of actions.

The action selected will be applied across all of the notes dropped onto it. The available actions include pinning the notes, moving them to trash, duplicating, sharing, copying the note links, copying the note identifiers, completing all tasks within selected notes, removing specific tags, and exporting or copying as one combined note, in various formats. The Export action provides several formats, including txt, markdown, Textbundle, PDF, Taskpaper, DOCX, and a couple of others.

While I still have been using Ulysses more frequently for notes and writing, I do have some notes in Bear, particularly some personal documentation (because of Bear’s support for easy inter-note linking). I’m a fan of Bear, and would like to get more use out of it. With this latest update, they continue to take advantage of iOS features in a smart way that fits with their overall design, of which I am a fan. I may give them a try for more general notes again and see how useful the Drop Bar can be for me.

If you’ve not already checked it out, Bear is available for free on the App Store, with a $1.49/month subscription available as an in-app purchase to unlock Bear Pro.